Say "NO!" to Reimagine the Alamo.

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Save Our Texas Monuments

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Texas Monuments and Memorials are under attack. We promised to let you know just as soon as anything further developed and what action we would need to take.

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Clean Out Dallas City Hall

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Dallas City Hall is fraught with corruption. Now is our chance to clean house.  Changes are necessary to ensure our tax money is used appropriately.

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Dallas Landmark Commission Approves Demolition Permit

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Despite resounding opposition ...

  

Some of us attended the hearing of the Dallas Landmark Commission on Monday, March 4. Only three people spoke in favor of granting the demolition permit and about 25 of us spoke against it. The entire crowd present was only about 75 and the vast majority of them were against the demolition.  


After discussion, a motion was made to deny the permit and it failed 6 to 9.


Following more discussion, a motion was made to grant the permit. It passed 10 to 5—even though some of the members acknowledged that this was in direct violation of the Dallas Landmark Protection Ordinance.


There is now only one path left to save the Dallas monument. This decision can be appealed within 30 days, but that will only temporarily buy more time. 


However, I spoke with a number of people involved in filing a lawsuit to stop the removal. Hopefully, this legal action can drag things out past September 1. 


If we are able to get the Monument and Statue Protection Act passed in the State Legislature, it will go into effect on September 1 and this WILL save the Dallas Memorial. We will be providing you with information about this just as soon as the bills are assigned to committee in both houses of the Legislature.

 

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WORLD’S LARGEST ALAMO BATTLE DIORAMA COMING TO DALLAS

The Most Realistic Alamo Battle Model Ever Made

  

On Thursday morning, December 13, 2018 Tom Feely and his wife, Nancy, flew into Dallas for a meeting at the Hall of State in Fair Park with the Executive Director and both the retiring and current Curator of Exhibits. There Tom explained the Diorama in detail and they discussed the specifics about its transfer.


Afterwards the Hall of State folks showed them some of the Alamo artifacts that are in storage at the Hall of State. They intend to use these to create an Alamo exhibit to accompany Feely’s Diorama. These include Fannin’s watch given to him by his grandfather, a pistol recovered from Old Mexico believed to have possibly been that of Crockett at the Alamo, Santa Anna’s spurs captured at San Jacinto as well as a framed Dolores Calvary guidon (flag) captured right outside Santa Anna’s tent that would also have been at the Battle of the Alamo, among others.


Rick Range also agreed to let them have a couple of Alamo items that he has, and he also volunteered to procure some additional ones owned by other individuals throughout Texas.


Tom had never seen the Hall of State before and he was mightily impressed both by it and the people in charge. Due to the situation at the Alamo, he fully agreed that this will be an excellent venue for the Diorama, one where it will be appreciated and people can come from all over and see it for free.


This Diorama is the largest of its kind in the world (24 feet by 14 feet), and by far the most accurate in every detail, including almost 2,000 hand-painted figures of the soldiers and animals. 

 

So much for San Antonio—it is their loss. George P. Bush and company have already removed Tom’s earlier outdated Alamo battle diorama. They can now have their new politically correct museum (if it ever gets built) chock full of multi-heritage artifacts unrelated to the 1836 Battle. But here in Dallas we will proudly have the Alamo Battle on full glorious display for all the world to see as it has never been portrayed before. 


(All of the current models and depictions of the Alamo in San Antonio are based on old research and contain major inaccuracies.) 


Dallas will be the place to come if you want to see what the 1836 Alamo and the Battle actually looked like in all its realism.


The Hall of State is to shortly begin preparation of the space for the Alamo Exhibit and Diorama. Plans are to have the Hall of State people transport the Diorama to Dallas from Pennsylvania sometime after April. After twenty years’ work, this tremendous historical piece will finally be on full public display in Texas. 

Hall of State at Fair Park, Dallas

Originally called the State of Texas Building, the Hall of State originally debuted in 1836 as part of the Texas Centennial Exhibition. 


Eventually designed by Donald Barthelme, the building is a premier example of Cret's Modernism. The design blends classicism and Art Deco – with a few Texas motifs (cacti, oil wells) tossed in for good measure.


Crafted from Texas limestone, The Hall of State was, at a cost of $1.2 million, the most expensive building per square foot built in Texas at the time.

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Breaking News

George P. Bush signs plan to overhaul Alamo Plaza

Bush signed the proposal over the objections of several Republican lawmakers.


BY CASSANDRA POLLOCK SEPT. 13, 2018    Texas Tribune


Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush has signed a proposal to overhaul Alamo Plaza, he announced Thursday morning.

"Yesterday I signed the resolution advancing the Alamo plan," Bush tweeted. "I ask the mayor to join me in executing this plan to treat the Alamo with the respect and reverence it deserves. God bless the Alamo and God bless Texas."


The proposal, which has drawn backlash in recent months from some Republicans in the Texas Legislature, was unanimously approved last week by the Alamo Management Committee and then sent to Bush and San Antonio Mayor Ron Nirenberg. Nirenberg's office told The Texas Tribune on Thursday afternoon that there are still a number of steps to work through before the mayor can approve the plan.


Bush's announcement comes the day before a number of Republican lawmakers, including state Reps. Kyle Biedermann of Fredericksburg and Lyle Larson of San Antonio, were scheduled to hold a news conference on Alamo grounds opposing the plan. A spokesperson for the group confirmed Thursday afternoon that they still planned to hold the event.

Another state lawmaker, state Sen. Donna Campbell of New Braunfels, penned a Sept. 6 letter to Bush highlighting her concerns over relocating the Alamo Cenotaph, a 60-foot-tall monument currently located near the center of the Alamo Plaza. The overhaul plan, according to news reports, suggests moving the Cenotaph about 500 feet south.


“Many questions about the expense and feasibility of removing and relocating such a massive and beautiful monument without damaging it have not been addressed,” she wrote. “I urge the committee and the land office to slow down, prioritize accountability to the citizens of Texas, and reconsider the delicate history that is being reimagined here at an undetermined cost.”


There's also the question of how the state's regulatory requirements would impact the project.


In a letter dated Aug. 22, Texas Historical Commission Executive Director Mark Wolfe clarified to Bush and Niremberg the role the commission plays in the decision-making process. Wolfe said "work on, or alterations to [state archaeological landmarks] requires the issuance of a permit by the THC," adding that since the Cenotaph is on Alamo grounds, it is subject to those same provisions under state statute.


Bush's office told the Tribune on Thursday afternoon that it plans to request permits for items owned by the General Land Office when appropriate. The office also said that the city of San Antonio owns the Cenotaph and would be responsible for requesting a permit to relocate it. Nirenberg's office said in a statement to the Tribune that San Antonio "will go through every regulatory agency required."


Meanwhile, another debate over the Alamo has recently dominated Texas headlines. After a working group of the State Board of Education had proposed removing “heroic” when defining Alamo defenders from the seventh-grade social studies curriculum, Gov. Greg Abbott and other Texas elected officials — including Bush — called on Texans to stop what Abbott described as “political correctness” in schools. The board changed course after the backlash and tentatively voted earlier this week to keep the language intact.

The Cenotaph will move

Despite outcries from historical and heritage organizations as well as loud protests from Texas citizens, it appears the plan will be implemented.

Must Read

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Excellent Summary of the Reason We Fight for the Alamo

 Tony E. Arterburn, Jr. is a former U.S. Army Paratrooper, a veteran of three foreign wars, radio host, published columnist, and world champion powerlifter. He lives with his wife Melissa, son Houston, and chocolate lab Layla in San Antonio, Texas.  


He has written this thoughtful and thought-provoking piece that we wanted to share with you. 


REMEMBER TO VOTE ON MARCH 2 (LAST DAY OF EARLY VOTING) OR MARCH 6 (ELECTION DAY).

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Help Our Cause

If you would like to help Save the Alamo Committee save the Alamo, you may send your check to Rick Range, 702 Briarwood Dr., Garland, TX 75041.

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Defend the Alamo

Be a Modern-Day Defender of the Alamo

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Heroes and History are under Assault

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We are a grass roots organization dedicated to preserving the integrity of our most sacred Texas Shrine. Please stand with us in face of revisionist history elites and politically correct financiers of George P. Bush. Say NO to "Reimagine the Alamo."

Let's Save the Alamo Together

 "If enacted this plan by George P. Bush will be every bit as destructive to the Alamo as was the Mexican Army in 1836. Every Texan should be outraged.Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush is foisting upon the people of Texas a horrible and disrespectful plan for the Alamo. He has consistently thwarted or ignored every objection by the citizens of this State and all attempts to stop it.The current plan for the Alamo is a looming disaster that must be prevented."- Rick Range 

2017-2018 Save the Alamo Committee - Rick Range Founder

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